Politica

DALLAS, Nov. 26, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Foundation of the American Board of Trial Advocates (ABOTA) received a grant of $10,000 from the Texas Bar Foundation to support a new curriculum guide for its Teachers Law School program. The guide is being developed in collaboration with the American Bar Association (ABA), Division of Public Education, to address the topics of separation of powers, independence of the judiciary, 7th Amendment and trial by jury, and the Federal and state court systems. The guide also includes synopses of more than 100 lesson plans to teach these topics, all of which have been vetted by the ABA. Texas is the founding location of the Teachers Law School, which provides teachers with a crash course in the legal system. The Teachers Law School is designed for middle and high school government, social studies, history, law and civics educators. Through presentations and discussions on current legal issues, the Teachers Law School gives teachers the tools to help students understand and appreciate the American civil and criminal legal systems and the role they play in students' lives and society. The new curriculum guide will provide additional core knowledge on the judicial system for teachers and their students. Teachers Law Schools have been held in Texas since 2009 and the program has branched out into multiple states. In 2014 alone, nearly 500 teachers nationwide participated in the law school. "Educating young people about the Constitution and the "We the People" participatory role of engaged citizens is at the core of our mission," said Michael P. Maguire, ABOTA Foundation President. "We are delighted to have the support of the Texas Bar Foundation as we create a core curriculum for the Teachers Law School." Since its inception in 1965, the Texas Bar Foundation has awarded more than $15 million…
WASHINGTON, Nov. 21, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights by majority vote commends President Obama on his issuance of the Immigration Accountability Executive Action, which focuses on repairing some of the fundamental flaws in our current immigration system. The Commission stated, "We understand the outlined actions are not comprehensive, and in order to fully modernize our system of immigration, Congress will need to act. Nevertheless, the actions taken by the President today allow immigrants to come out of the shadows, expand DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) to protect more DREAMers (Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors), allow families to remain together as they forge ahead toward the American Dream, and protect victims of human trafficking. "The Commission has shown a historic interest in the issue of immigration to our great nation. In 1980, the Commission issued a systemic examination of U.S. 'immigration law, practice and procedure.'[1] The Tarnished Golden Door: Civil Rights Issues in Immigration identified numerous problems with the laws as they were and the manner in which the then-chief immigration agency, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, administered and enforced those laws. The Commission and several of its state advisory committees have periodically held briefings and issued reports concerning discrete issues related to immigration.[2] In April 2003, the Commission issued Summary of Migrant Civil Rights Issues Along the Southwest Border.[3] More recently, we held a briefing in Alabama on the civil rights implications of state immigration enforcement laws, and in January of 2015 we will hold a briefing on the civil rights conditions at immigration detentions facilities, as well as the civil rights of the recently arrived unaccompanied minor refugees. "With today's Executive Action, President Obama has taken important steps to make the system more fair and just, and to protect the rights of…
AUSTIN, Texas, Nov. 20, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- As 3,000 city officials gathered in Austin, Texas, for the National League of Cities (NLC) annual meeting, it remained clear that comprehensive immigration reform is overdue. NLC welcomes the president's use of executive authority to take steps to fix our country's immigration system. For years NLC has called for federal action to fix the nation's broken immigration system. After interminable delays stretching over two administrations, we applaud the president taking action to address the problem. "The president is to be commended for his strong leadership today," said Mayor Chris Coleman, Saint Paul, Minn., and current President of the National League of Cities. He continued, "The use of executive authority in this manner can go a long way towards providing a fully workable solution to this crisis." But executive action is not enough. The nation's cities and towns call on Congress and the Administration to take further steps to change the laws to fix the system. "Cities need federal policy makers working together to go even further than the president's action today," said Mayor Ralph Becker, Salt Lake City and the incoming president of the National League of Cities. He continued, "Without a more comprehensive approach that addresses issues like providing resources to integrate immigrant families into our cities, the problems associated with our current immigration system will continue." President Obama's action today contains a number of items that are of significance to cities: Enhancing security efforts at the border; Creating strategies to ensure families remain together; Requiring undocumented immigrants to undergo background checks and pay taxes; Freeing local governments of responsibility for housing felon. As we move forward, any reform of the nation's immigration system must: Create a pathway to earned citizenship; Modernize the legal immigration system to attract skilled workers; and Provide…

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